The Tree of Life

The scientific name for coconut is Cocos nucifera. The coconut provides a nutritious source of meat, juice, milk, and oil that has fed and nourished populations around the world for generations.

Nearly one third of the world’s population depends on coconut to some degree for their food and their economy.
Coconut is highly nutritious and rich in fiber, vitamins, and minerals. It is classified as a “functional food” because it provides many health benefits beyond its nutritional content. Coconut oil is of special interest because it possesses healing properties far beyond that of any other dietary oil and is extensively used in traditional medicine among Asian and Pacific populations. When the coconut tree is tapped, it produces a highly nutrient-rich “sap” that exudes from the coconut blossoms. This sap is very low glycemic (GI of only 35), diabetic-friendly, is an abundant source of 17 amino acids, minerals, vitamin C, broad-spectrum B vitamins, and has a nearly neutral pH.

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When the coconut tree is tapped, it produces a highly nutrient-rich “sap” that exudes from the coconut blossoms. This sap is very low glycemic (GI of only 35), diabetic-friendly, is an abundant source of 17 amino acids, minerals, vitamin C, broad-spectrum B vitamins, and has a nearly neutral pH.

Health Benefits of Coconuts

Modern medicine has also found coconuts nutritionally beneficial because:
1. They’re loaded with naturally sterile electrolytes, which feed your pH and muscle function
2. They have a high fiber content, which makes you feel full longer and helps regulate elimination
3. They’re rich in lauric acid, which converts to monolaurin. Monolaurin is the compound found in breast milk that strengthens a baby’s immunity, and a great deal of research has been done to establish the ability of lauric acid to enhance immunity. This medium-chain fatty acid (MCFA) actually disrupts the lipid membranes of offending organisms.
4. They offer high levels of manganese, potassium, and phosphorus.